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The hummus recipe that "saved" BReD! 

You heard Ed and Natasha talk about it on the podcast, here it is! The very same recipe that Ed uses at the bakery! Excerpted from BReD by Edward Tatton and Natasha Tatton. Copyright © 2023 Edward Tatton and Natasha Tatton. Photography by Janis Nicolay. Published by Penguin, an imprint of Penguin Canada, a division of Penguin Random House Canada Limited. Reproduced by arrangement with the Publisher. All rights reserved.

d i p s , s p r e a d s , a n d a c c o m pa n i m e n t s 333 

 

 Chickpea Hummus 

Makes about 2 to 2.5kg (about 5 lb) 

I much prefer using dried chickpeas instead of canned when making hummus, as they yield a fresher taste and more nutrients, plus the cooking liquid can be turned into the egg white substitute called aquafaba (see Note). If you are short on time, though, there is no problem using canned organic chickpeas; reserve the aquafaba for other uses. This recipe can be cut in half to make a smaller batch if desired. 

note: To make aquafaba, return 12 cups (3L) of the cooking liquid to the saucepan, bring to a boil, then reduce the heat to medium and simmer until reduced to a syrupy consistency weighing 300g, 15 to 20 minutes. Reducing the aquafaba intensifies its protein content and strength, giving it the viscosity of egg whites, so it can be used in many recipes that call for egg whites. Store aquafaba in an airtight container in the fridge for up to 5 days or pour tablespoons into ice cube trays and freeze for up to 1 month. Use in recipes such as French Meringues (page 327), Italian Meringue (page 329), Double Chocolate and Tahini Brownies (page 258), or Orange, Cardamom, and Olive Oil Brioche (page 139).

 

300g (1½ cups) dried chickpeas (or three 14 oz/ 400mL cans chickpeas) 

12 cups (3L) cold water, for cooking the chickpeas 

200g (1 cup) roasted tahini, divided 

10g (5 teaspoons) lemon zest, divided 

100g (½ cup) lemon juice, divided 

40g chopped garlic (2 to 4 cloves), divided 

10g (1¾ teaspoons) fine sea salt, divided 

4 to 6½ cups (1 to 1.5L) water at room temperature, divided 

Garnishes 

50g (1/3 cup) white sesame seeds 

25g (2 tablespoons) extra-virgin olive oil 

1. The night before, rinse the dried chickpeas in cold water, then place them in a large bowl or other container and pour in cold water to cover by at least 2 inches (5cm). Cover and let sit on the counter for about 12 hours. The chickpeas will expand and soften. 

2. Drain the chickpeas and transfer them to a large saucepan. Add the cold water and bring to a boil, then reduce the heat to low and simmer, partially covered, and cook until the chickpeas are soft and very tender, about 45 minutes, periodically skimming off and discarding the white foam that forms on top. Remove from the heat and drain (reserve the cooking water to make aquafaba; see Note). Reserve a small amount of whole chickpeas for garnish. 

 

3. Preheat the oven to 350°F (175°C). Scatter the sesame seeds on a small baking sheet and lightly toast them in the oven until they are golden brown, 5 to 6 minutes. Set aside to cool. 

 

4. Place half of the warm chickpeas in a food processor and blend to a smooth paste, 2 to 3 minutes. 

 

5. Add half each of the tahini, lemon zest, lemon juice, garlic, and salt and continue blending for another few minutes until smooth. With the machine running, slowly add half the room-temperature water and blend for 4 to 5 minutes, until the hummus is velvety smooth. Taste the hummus and add more salt if needed. Scrape the hummus into a large bowl. 

 

6. Repeat with the remaining half of the ingredients. Add the hummus to the first batch and stir to combine. 

 

7. Spoon some of the hummus into a serving bowl and garnish with the reserved chickpeas, a drizzle of olive oil, and the toasted sesame seeds. 

 

8. Store the remaining hummus in an airtight container in the fridge for up to 5 days. Best brought to room temperature before serving. 

Excerpted from BReD by Edward Tatton and Natasha Tatton. Copyright © 2023 Edward Tatton and Natasha Tatton. Photography by Janis Nicolay. Published by Penguin, an imprint of Penguin Canada, a division of Penguin Random House Canada Limited. Reproduced by arrangement with the Publisher. All
rights reserved.

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