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Flaco and birds of prey in NYC





I've always loved birds but will admit that it has definitely become more of an interest since turning 40 (see my post on that here). Today, I want to write specifically about birds of prey in living in New York City.


If you're like me, you might be surprised to learn that owls and hawks live in the city that never sleeps but, they do. I decided to include this blog in my Earth Week series as it is important that we understand the innerworkings of our ecosystem and that we aren't just killing one animal we view as a "pest," we're actually putting other animals at risk. Animals we describe as majestic, those we may even feel lucky to see while wandering the streets of NY. Keep reading to see what I mean.


The Instagram post below this paragraph is about a Eurasian eagle-owl named Flaco. Flaco died after a window collision, he was likely disoriented and suffering from effects from consuming prey who had eaten rodenticide.




This is Boho, she was a red-tailed hawk who also died because she ate prey who had consumed rodenticide.




Maybe in this moment you're feeling sad for Flaco and Boho but are concerned about the rat population in NYC or other large cities. Maybe, it seems like that's just the breaks, we can't have rats just overrunning the cities, right?!


Through the Wild Bird Funds' post about Boho, I found the organization RATS (Raptors are the Solution) whose focus is educating the masses about the dangers of rodenticides and the impact it has not just on birds of prey but our ecosystems as a whole. Poisons passing through the food chain cannot be a positive outcome for anyone.


There has to be a better way.







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8 Comments


Guest
Apr 16

Thanks for sharing. I am sure we have similar situations here in Chicago.


--

Tim Brannan, The Other Side blog

https://theotherside.timsbrannan.com/

2024 A to Z of Dungeons & Dragons, Celebrating 50 Years of D&D

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I'm sure you're right. I'd love to know if there is a city somewhere figuring this out.

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Guest
Apr 16

Thank you for sharing this story with me. The impact of pesticides does effect us all. As noted by another guest in the comments, Monsanto is a company that was trying to help farmers keep crops from being eaten by pests. So they graphed roundup into the corn... while it did keep the pest away, we as the consumers were also eating the pesticide in our food and processed foods. The start of a chain reaction that we are still at the effect of today.

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I remember how horrified I was when I learned about Monsanto. How they have modified our food is disgusting, they also take farms (and livelihoods) when Monsanto seed happens to blow into neighboring farms,

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Guest
Apr 16

Thanks for sharing we all knew about Floco he got all the publicity but I had no idea of the others. Hopefully by you bringing this to a wider audience something will be done. Thanks again

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I hope so too, thanks for reading

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Guest
Apr 16

I feel the same way about human animals and Roundup's long-term, multi-generational impact. So I definitely see your point. Thanks for sharing those stories! - Jeanine

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I feel that way too about Roundup. Thanks for reading!

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